Read this Now: Librarian Reviews

John Green's The Fault In Our Stars

Do you like reading realistic fiction about teens?  John Green is an author to check out, with his special mix of clever humor and honesty about real issues we all face.   His latest book, The Fault In Our Stars, isn't due out until January, but you can go ahead and sign up for the waiting list. 

While you're waiting, check out his other books: Looking for Alaska, Paper Towns (my favorite!), An Abundance of Katherines, or Will Grayson, Will Grayson

The wee Free Men by Terry Pratchett

Witches. Love'em, hate'em, they aren't all covered in warts, green and really old. You know over 40. Terry Pratchett, author of the Discworld series introduces us to teen age witch Tiffany Aching who has to team up with the Wee Free Men, a clan of six-inch-high blue men, to rescue her baby brother and ward off a sinister invasion from Fairyland.

SORTA LIKE THE FAIRY TALE…BUT NOT

 

Modernized Fairy Tales seem to be everywhere these days: on TV, at the movies (2 Snow Whites!) and in books. I really liked these two and think the writer has a chance to help us all live happily ever after if she will just keep on writing!

book cover

SISTERS RED

by Jackson Pearce

'Captain America:The first avenger' arrives on DVD at the Library!!

If you're a huge Cap fan and havent seen the blockbuster film (shame on you!) The first copies have arrived at the Library.  Request it before the wait list get too long!!

"It is 1942, America has entered World War II, and sickly but determined Steve Rogers is frustrated at being rejected yet again for military service. Everything changes when Dr. Erksine recruits him for the secret Project Rebirth. Proving his extraordinary courage, wits and conscience, Rogers undergoes the experiment and his weak body is suddenly enhanced into the maximum human potential. When Dr. Erksine is then immediately assassinated by an agent of Nazi Germany's head of its secret HYDRA research department, Johann Schmidt aka the Red Skull, Rogers is left as a unique man who is initially misused as a propaganda mascot. However, when his comrades need him, Rogers goes on a successful adventure that truly makes him Captain America and his war against Schmidt begins.

Delirium by Lauren Oliver

DeliriumThe premise of Delirium intrigued me from the beginning.  The idea of love and other emotions as part of a mental illness or human weakness had been well played out in classic dystopian literature and film, but I was interested in Oliver's take on the subject. It proved to be worth my time.

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